Categories: Svalbard

Svalbard

“Hearts in the ice” – expedition

“I like to look at things from a different angle. People have more strength than they give themselves credit for,” says Hilde.

Scandinavian Airline inflight magazine

 

Svalbard

“Hearts in the ice” – expedition

Since 1971, Svalbard has experienced a rise of 7 degrees in winter temperature, and the Arctic is warming twice as fast as the global average. Reduced snow cover is changing the local vegetation, and the climate change has a major consequences for humans, animals and ecosystems.

Scandinavian Airline inflight magazine

 

Svalbard

“Hearts in the ice” – expedition

For the past two years, Hilde and Sunniva have prepared intensively, both physically and mentally for Bamsebu.

“We’ve been working on how to handle stress, how we communicate, what makes us sad and angry, and what may happen. We’ve worked on how to be supportive of each other. Our mental capacity fascinates me more than the physical,” Sunniva says.

Scandinavian Airline inflight magazine

Svalbard

“Hearts in the ice” – expedition

Several barrels full of supplies will have to keep Hilde and Sunniva going for nine months.

Scandinavian Airline inflight magazine

Svalbard

“Hearts in the ice” – expedition

Saying goodbye to family and friends and all the comforts of home. For the next nine months, including 30 days with no sunlight, Bamsebu will be their home.

Scandinavian Airline inflight magazine

Svalbard

“Hearts in the ice” – expedition

Scandinavian Airline inflight magazine

Svalbard

“Hearts in the ice” – expedition

Getting ready for nine months in Bamsebu. The small trapper´s hut has no running water or electricity, but a wood fire will keep Hilde and Sunniva warm.

Scandinavian Airline inflight magazine

Svalbard

“Hearts in the ice”– expedition

A remote cabin in the majestic Ingebrigt Bay in southern Svalbard

Scandinavian Airline inflight magazine

 

Svalbard

“Hearts in the ice” – expedition

Ever since Hilde moved to Svalbard in 1995, she’s been monitoring changes in temperature, glaciers, fjords and mountains.

“The glaciers used to be up to 5 km farther out in the fjords than they are today. When I first came here, there were only very few patches of green. Now the whole island is green. New species are arriving, and we don’t know how this will affect the food chain.”

Scandinavian Airline inflight magazine

Svalbard

“Hearts in the ice” – expedition

Hilde Fålun Strøm and Sunniva Sørby became the 1st woman team to overwinter in the Arctic in 2019-2020 in a small trapper’s hut with no electricity or running water, 140 km away from civilization. Their mission was to engage our global community in the conversation around climate change and what each of us can do.